Non-LPR Cancellation and Practice Tips for Preparing a Case for Individual Hearing

Recorded Date: 
04/03/2014
Recorded Length: 
90 Minutes
MCLE: 
1.5 CA

This webinar will review the legal requirements for non-LPR cancellation and how to build a winning case. We will cover some of the common obstacles to eligibility, such as the complicated crime bars. In addition, we will discuss building a strong case with your client, bringing forward creative evidence, gathering documents, and preparing your client for testimony.

Presenters:

Erin Quinn, ILRC Staff Attorney
Erin brings to ILRC over 8 years of experience as an immigration defense attorney and holds a joint degree in law and public policy (JD/MPP) from the University of Michigan. Prior to opening her own practice in 2007, Ms. Quinn represented immigrants as an associate at the Law Office of Robert B. Jobe. Her experience in immigration law and policy includes working as a fellow for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, EU headquarters in Belgium; clerking for the Immigration Court of San Francisco; and guest lecturer at CSU Eastbay. Originally from Fresno, California, Erin loves language and travel. She lived in Romania for over two years as a Peace Corps volunteer and worked in Hungary as a teacher trainer. In addition she has traveled, studied and taught in Central America, South Africa and Europe. Erin is on the Advisory Council for the Northern California Chapter of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), in which she serves as Pro Bono Coordinator, and is a member of the California Bar.

Grisel Ruiz, ILRC Law Fellow
Grisel joined the ILRC in 2012 through a fellowship focused on the intersection between immigration law and criminal law.  Prior to joining the ILRC, Grisel was a litigation association at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP.  Before Pillsbury, Grisel received the Stimson Fellowship to head a project jointly housed at the Immigration Law Clinic at UC Davis School of Law and the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, through which she co-founded “Know Your Rights” programs at two local ICE-contracted facilities.  These projects provided individual representation, pro bono referrals, pro se materials, and case consultations to hundreds of detained immigrants in removal proceedings.  Grisel also provided community presentations regarding constitutional rights when confronted by law enforcement and supervised law students in removal defense cases before the Executive Office for Immigration Review.  Grisel is fluent in Spanish and graduated from the University of Chicago Law School where she received the Tony Patiño Fellowship.  Prior to law school she worked as a paralegal and coordinator at the National Immigrant Justice Center.  She attended the University of Notre Dame for her B.A.