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Recorded Date:
11/12/2015
Recorded Length:
90 Minutes
Recording, $105.00

This webinar will explain the requirements for applying for an AB 60 license as well as the potential risks of applying for certain people with prior immigration or criminal violations, or who have used false information to apply for a license in the past.  The webinar will walk through the new immigration enforcement priorities, and how these priorities could affect AB 60 license applicants.  Using examples, we will also explain what to expect if your client does get referred by the DMV to secondary or application review.

Presenters:

Alison Kamhi, ILRC Staff Attorney

Alison is a dedicated immigrant advocate who brings significant experience in immigration law to the ILRC. Prior to the ILRC, Alison worked as a Clinical Teaching Fellow at the Stanford Law School Immigrants' Rights Clinic, where she supervised removal defense cases and immigrants' rights advocacy projects.  Before Stanford, she represented abandoned and abused immigrant youth as a Skadden Fellow at Bay Area Legal Aid and at Catholic Charities Community Services in New York.  While in law school, Alison worked at the UNHCR, the ACLU Immigrants' Rights Project, and Greater Boston Legal Services Immigration Unit. After law school, she clerked for the Honorable Julia Gibbons in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.  Alison enjoys playing the piano and traveling.  Before law school, she received a Fulbright Scholarship to study the rise of neo-Nazism and anti-immigrant sentiment in former East Germany.  She has also lived in Russia, France, Cambodia, and Madagascar.  Alison received her J.D. from Harvard Law School and her B.A. from Stanford University.

Grisel Ruiz, ILRC Staff Attorney

Grisel joined the ILRC in 2012 through a fellowship focused on the intersection between immigration law and criminal law.  Prior to joining the ILRC, Grisel was a litigation association at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP.  Before Pillsbury, Grisel received the Stimson Fellowship to head a project jointly housed at the Immigration Law Clinic at UC Davis School of Law and the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, through which she co-founded “Know Your Rights” programs at two local ICE-contracted facilities.  These projects provided individual representation, pro bono referrals, pro se materials, and case consultations to hundreds of detained immigrants in removal proceedings.  Grisel also provided community presentations regarding constitutional rights when confronted by law enforcement and supervised law students in removal defense cases before the Executive Office for Immigration Review.  Grisel is fluent in Spanish and graduated from the University of Chicago Law School where she received the Tony Patiño Fellowship.  Prior to law school she worked as a paralegal and coordinator at the National Immigrant Justice Center.  She attended the University of Notre Dame for her B.A.