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Date and Time:
11/15/2017 11:00am to 12:30pm PST
Recorded Date:
11/15/2017
Place:
Online
Registration Deadline:
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 11:00am
Presenter:
Ariel Brown
Alison Kamhi
Nikki Marquez
MCLE:
1.5 CA
Recording, $105.00

This webinar will provide an up-to-date overview of USCIS guidance on extreme hardship. Panelists will review the factors outlined by USCIS as well as the legal standard required for a successful hardship waiver for different grounds of inadmissibility. An important component of the 2016 USCIS guidance is the inclusion of “particularly significant factors” or circumstances that strongly support a finding of extreme hardship. Panelists will explore these scenarios in depth and provide tips on how to connect your client’s story with the elements highlighted in the USCIS guidance.

Presenters

Ariel Brown

Ariel Brown joined the ILRC in April 2017. After five years in private practice at a well-respected immigration firm in Sacramento, Schoenleber & Waltermire, PC, Ariel brings extensive practical experience to the ILRC. She has experience filing numerous immigration applications and regularly appearing before USCIS, ICE, and EOIR, with cases spanning the areas of removal defense, family-based adjustment of status and consular processing, DACA, naturalization, SIJS, U visas, and VAWA. She was also involved in establishing Sacramento’s rapid response network to respond to immigration enforcement action, and served as an American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA)-USCIS liaison.

Ariel contributes to the ILRC’s Attorney of the Day legal technical assistance program, as well as writing and updating practice advisories and manuals and presenting on family-based topics for ILRC webinars.

Prior to joining the ILRC, Ariel also briefly volunteered with the International Institute of the Bay Area in Oakland, and Catholic Charities of the East Bay in Richmond. In law school, Ariel was a student advocate with the UC Davis Immigration Law Clinic, assisting with cancellation of removal cases for indigent noncitizens, and an editor for the Journal of International Law and Policy.

Ariel earned her law degree from the University of California at Davis, and her undergraduate degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, where she majored in anthropology. Ariel is admitted to the state bar in California.

Alison Kamhi

Alison Kamhi is a Supervising Attorney based in San Francisco. Alison is a dedicated immigrant advocate who brings significant experience in immigration law to the ILRC. Alison provides technical assistance through the ILRC’s Attorney of the Day program on a wide range of immigration issues, including immigration options for youth, consequences of criminal convictions for immigration purposes, removal defense strategy, and eligibility for immigration relief, including family-based immigration, U visas, VAWA, DACA, cancellation of removal, asylum, and naturalization. She leads ILRC’s project on driver’s licenses for immigrants, and also conducts frequent in-person and webinar trainings on naturalization, family-based immigration, U visas, FOIA requests, and parole in immigration law.

She has co-authored a number of publications, including The U Visa: Obtaining Status for Immigrant Victims of Crimes (ILRC); Parole in Immigration Law (ILRC); FOIA Requests and Other Background Checks (ILRC); Hardship in Immigration Law (ILRC); Naturalization and U.S. Citizenship (ILRC); Special Immigrant Juvenile Status and Other Immigration Options for Children and Youth (ILRC); A Guide for Immigrant Advocates (ILRC); and Most In Need But Least Served: Legal and Practical Barriers to Special Immigrant Juvenile Status for Federally Detained Minors, 50 Fam. Ct. Rev. 4 (2012).

Prior to the ILRC, Alison worked as a Clinical Teaching Fellow at the Stanford Law School Immigrants' Rights Clinic, where she supervised removal defense cases and immigrants' rights advocacy projects. Before Stanford, she represented abandoned and abused immigrant youth as a Skadden Fellow at Bay Area Legal Aid and at Catholic Charities Community Services in New York. While in law school, Alison worked at the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the ACLU Immigrants' Rights Project, and Greater Boston Legal Services Immigration Unit. After law school, she clerked for the Honorable Julia Gibbons in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.

Alison received her J.D. from Harvard Law School and her B.A. from Stanford University. Alison is admitted to the bar in California and New York. She speaks German and Spanish.

Nikki Marquez

Nikki joined the ILRC in October of 2015. Nikki focuses on immigration enforcement issues, including efforts to limit local law enforcement's cooperation with federal immigration agencies. She contributes to ILRC's work with schools and develops know-your-rights resources. Nikki also works on ILRC's manuals, practice advisories, webinars, and other resources. Nikki has co-authored several publications including Hardship in Immigration Law: How to Prepare Winning Applications for Hardship Waivers and Cancellation of Removal (ILRC), Know Your Rights: A Train the Trainer Toolkit, Arming the Community with Education (ILRC), The Rise of Sanctuary: Getting Local Officers out of the Business of Deportations in the Trump Era (ILRC), Searching for Sanctuary: An Analysis of America's Counties & Their Voluntary Assistance with Deportations (ILRC), and Local Options for Protecting Immigrants: A Collection of City and County Policies to Protect Immigrants from Discrimination and Deportation (ILRC).

In law school, Nikki participated in the Immigrants' Rights Clinic and worked at the ACLU's Immigrants' Rights Project. Prior to law school, Nikki worked at Polaris, an anti-human trafficking organization, where she focused on state policy and worked on their National Human Trafficking Hotline. Nikki has also worked on issues related to economic security for survivors of domestic and sexual violence.

Nikki earned her law degree from Stanford Law School. She received her undergraduate degree from Stanford University, where she majored in public policy and economics. Nikki also received a master’s degree in international relations and international economics from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. She is admitted to the California bar. She is conversant in Spanish.