webinar_icon.png
Date and Time:
11/25/2019 12:00pm to 1:00pm PST
Recorded Date:
11/25/2019
Place:
Online
Registration Deadline:
Monday, November 25, 2019 - 12:00pm
Presenter:
Amanda Baran
Peggy Gleason
Melissa Rodgers
Sally Kinoshita
MCLE:
0.00

In its latest attack on immigrants, on November 14, 2019, the Department of Homeland Security published a proposed rule increasing the filing fees on many immigration applications, eliminating most fee waivers, and transferring over $200 million to ICE. If implemented, these changes will make immigration benefits inaccessible to low- and moderate-income families while transferring the burden of enforcement onto the backs of immigrants, U.S. citizens and U.S. companies, all of whom would be forced to pay higher fees.

Join the ILRC to learn how you can fight back against these changes. During this video conference, we will discuss:

  • The state of play including the main changes proposed in the fee rule, upcoming changes to fee waivers, and what these changes could mean for our communities;
  • Ways to resist these changes including how to draft and submit an effective public comment by December 16, 2019; and
  • The importance of involving your Members of Congress.

Presenters

Amanda Baran

Amanda Baran is an attorney and advocate who serves as a consultant for the ILRC.  Before starting her own consulting practice, she worked at the Department of Homeland Security for almost ten years where she held a number of significant positions including Chief of Public Engagement at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services and most recently, Principal Director of Immigration Policy for the Department’s Office of Policy.  In 2011, she served as Senior Advisor to the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders where she focused on immigration, civil rights, and women’s rights and engaged with community leaders across the country.  Prior to joining the federal government, Amanda was a Staff Attorney with Legal Momentum’s Immigrant Women Program where she advocated for the Violence Against Women Act and trained a wide variety of stakeholders on issues related to immigrant women’s access to health care, immigration benefits, family court, and public benefits.  Amanda began her legal career as a staff attorney at Legal Services of North West Texas where she represented victims of domestic violence.  She received her law degree from the University of Houston Law Center and obtained dual degrees in government and English from the University of Texas at Austin.  Amanda immigrated to the United States as a child and lives in Arlington, Virginia, with her husband and two boys.

Peggy Gleason

Peggy Gleason, who has dedicated her career to immigrant rights, joined ILRC in 2019 as a senior staff attorney in Washington, D.C.

She worked most recently in the Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties at the Department of Homeland Security, dealing with civil rights complaints concerning U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Earlier, she worked on family and humanitarian immigration policy and legal issues for the Citizenship and Immigration Services Ombudsman and on legal access issues for the Department of Justice Executive Office of Immigration Review.

Before her time with the federal government, she was a senior attorney for Catholic Legal Immigration Network’s training and technical support section for 23 years, providing technical assistance and training to CLINIC’s affiliated programs and other nonprofits nationwide. She also represented immigrant clients of Catholic Charities Immigration Legal Services for the Archdiocese of Washington. She began fulltime practice of immigration law while working for the Colorado Rural Legal Services Farmworker Program.

She graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a B.A. in Ibero-American Studies and earned her J.D. at Antioch School of Law in Washington, D.C. She is a member of the Colorado Bar.

Peggy is a frequent speaker on immigration law topics and contributor to publications. She speaks Spanish.

Melissa Rodgers

Melissa Rodgers is the Director of Programs based in San Francisco. She directs the New Americans Campaign (NAC), a national initiative for which the ILRC serves as the lead agency, which brings together national and local organizations in partnership with a funder collaborative to increase naturalization among eligible lawful permanent residents. She contributes to the ILRC’s manual entitled, Naturalization and U.S. Citizenship: The Essential Legal Guide.

Melissa, who joined the ILRC in 2013, started her legal career working with mainly immigrant clients at the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County. She brings to the ILRC more than a decade of non-profit leadership experience. Prior to joining the ILRC, Melissa was the director of Blue Shield of California Foundation’s Health Care and Coverage program. Before that, she served as the Directing Attorney of the Child Care Law Center, the Associate Director of the UC Berkeley School of Law Center on Health, Economic & Family Security, and a Directing Attorney and Director of the Health Consumer Center at the Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County. She founded a medical-legal collaboration program with Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford, created and co-taught medical-legal courses at both Stanford Law School/Stanford Medical School and University of California at Berkeley School of Law/University of California at San Francisco. She has authored articles, policy briefs, and reports in the area of health care.

Melissa has a Master’s of Education as well as a law degree with honors from Harvard University. She also has a Certificate in Non-Profit Management from the OneJustice Executive Fellowship program. Melissa is a member of the California bar. She is a native speaker of French and is conversant in Spanish.

Sally Kinoshita

Sally Kinoshita is the ILRC’s Deputy Director based in San Francisco. In this role, she weaves together more than 20 years of nonprofit experience in immigration law, capacity building, advocacy, program development, and collaborative facilitation. Sally has provided technical assistance, trainings, and facilitation to groups on local, state, and national levels and has co-authored a number of publications including The U Visa: Obtaining Status for Immigrant Victims of Crime (ILRC), The VAWA Manual: Immigration Relief for Abused Immigrants (ILRC), Immigration Benchbook for Juvenile and Family Court Judges (ILRC), and Application of Protection Remedies for Victims of Domestic Abuse, Human Trafficking, and Crime under U.S. Law to Persons Physically Present in the U.S. Territories (Family Violence Prevention Fund).

Prior to working at the ILRC, Sally was a Staff Attorney at Asian Law Caucus and a consultant with ASISTA, the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild and Family Violence Prevention Fund/Futures Without Violence. During law school, she worked with the UC Davis Immigration Law Clinic, Northern California Coalition for Immigrant Rights, ACLU of Northern California, and California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation.

Sally is currently a member of the Leadership Council of Educators for Fair Consideration (E4FC) and has served as a Federal Bar Association Immigration Law Section Advisory Board Member and Central Valley Immigrant Integration Collaborative (CVIIC) Steering Committee Member.

Sally earned her law degree from the University of California at Davis. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of California at Berkeley, where she majored in sociology. She is admitted to the California bar.